Wednesday 30th Jul 2014

Articles tagged award winning

Swiss MINImalism

Posted on December 22, 2011 by

So excited are we at INITIALS about our Christmas Advent, we have a 2nd installment of our countdown to Christmas today!

The Mini famously represents values of modesty, economy and creativity. In a true example of ‘medium as message’, this resourceful billboard campaign recycles old ads to make new ones.

Layers of previous posters were cut away to reveal the stencil form of a Mini. This plays to Mini’s strengths, using the car’s iconic and instantly recognisable design to create eye-catching and arresting artwork.

Rolled out across Switzerland, this is a great example of a simple but beautifully executed idea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Submitted by Christmas Designer, Chris Perowne


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

FONT FIGHTS FLOOD

Posted on by

Our penultimate instalment for you in our countdown to Christmas, the INITIALS Advent continues…

The Tailand Flood Crisis 2011 happened to be the worst in 30 years. It affected the people, the businesses and even the stability of the government in Tailand.

So BBDO Bangkok teamed up with Thai Red Cross to launch a non profit project entitled Font Fights Flood (FFF). A charity project to help relief Thai flood victims. Each alphabet of FFF depicts real incidents that occurred during the floods in the South East Asian country.

Users are invited to download the font and make a donation to help the flood’s victims, as well as keep an historical record of the tragedy.

Even though as a font it’s not very useful, its a beautiful collection of illustrations from people living on roofs to chairs turned into walking shoes on water.

Download the free font and make a donation: www.fontfightsflood.com or go to the Facebook page to see what people have created using the typeface: www.facebook.com/fontfightsflood

Help Thailand back on dry ground.

Christmas Junior Designer, Simon Taylor


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I’m allowed to slag off my country. You’re not.

Posted on December 21, 2011 by

If you’re not feeling really Christmasy yet, then you should be! Only 3 campaigns left in our Christmas advent countdown, something from Eastern Europe this morning if you weren’t feeling cold enough already.

Romania’s homegrown chocolate bar ROM, wrapped in the country’s flag since 1964 and representative of Cold War nationalism, was loosing out to the flood of American and Western European imports as patriotic pride ebbed under a series of political scandals and an economic downturn. Drastic action was needed or this local specialty would be permanently replaced by international super brands.

McCann Ericsson’s response to this dire situation was a good old-fashioned dose of reverse psychology. If Romanians really didn’t care about their national confectionery, really only wanted American products, then ROM would just have to give them what they desired and become American too.

The new and improved, ROM, complete with star-spangled banner, launched with a fanfare of outdoor, press and TV spots reassuring Romanians that ROM was now cool and that they could now partake of the superior American way of life. The reaction was better than McCann could surely have hoped for, with spontaneous indignation expressed via hundreds of Youtube videos, thousands of petition signatures and four separate Facebook protest pages. After a week of public outrage, ROM returned clad in the Romanian tricolour and supported with a patriotic anthem sung by real Romanian fans.

The results: 67% of Romanians were exposed to the campaign, generating €300,000 of free media, with a 300% increase in ROM’s Facebook fan base in the first six days. Most importantly for the client, ROM’s sales increased 79% to retake the throne as the country’s favourite chocolate bar.

It just goes to show. No matter how much people complain about their country: they’re allowed to slag it off; but no one else is.

Submitted by Christmas Senior Communications Executive, Fi O’Donnell


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Replay success for Gatorade

Posted on December 20, 2011 by

As we continue our look at some of the best marketing campaigns, we move onto my favourite sports drink, Gartorade!

Gatorade’s Replay campaign has been cleaning up at award shows since it’s launch in late 2009. The premise is simple, give ex college sports teams the chance to relive unresolved games from their past and reignite their passion as athletes. (See original campaign trailer below.)

 

Throughout 2010/2011 it has had continued success with yet more award wins, Fox sports have turned Replay into a TV series, continuing it into it’s third season while airing to 95 million households, and there are plans for a feature film after approaches from nearly every major film studio.

So what is it that’s made Replay such a hit and more importantly given it the longevity every campaign dreams of?

Insight.

Replay is built from a series of strong insights; insight in to the product, into sports, and most importantly insight into the target audience. It is the passion, emotion and engagement of the audience that has driven the campaign and allowed it to achieve such a high number of impressions (notably, the majority of which through earned media.) It is much more than an ad campaign, Replay allows Gatorade to tell stories, stories that entertain, that viewers can relate to and be inspired by. Stories that are interesting and relevant to people’s lives and will always have them coming back for more.

Full 2011 Case Study & Awards Entry D&AD

  Submitted by Christmas Junior Art Director, Oli Wright


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jack Daniel’s Stop and stare, 19th December

Posted on December 19, 2011 by

We’re on the home straight of our countdown of the years best campaigns…

This year man evolved with technology. I can now read the paper, watch TV, play with my iPad and text on my Smartphone, all at the same time. Pretty impressive hey? And genetically I’m not even meant to be able to multitask.
So whilst there is understandable excitement at the ever expanding range of channels available, we must remember that there’s a form of cannibalisation in how they distract from one another. There are few arenas left where we have an almost fully focused, captivated audience. The cinema is one, and another is cross-track advertising on the London tube. And my campaign of the year lurked deep underground.
London commuters are tired, stressed, impatient, and importantly from an advertiser’s perspective, bored. Jack Daniel’s recognised that in this medium, advertising needs to entertain. And fortunately enough, Mr Jack has a pretty incredible story to tell. So they began to brighten up the mornings of those on the rat-race with an incredible journey through their heritage, encompassing everything from the mystery surrounding their founding father, to the types of barrel and coal used to cultivate their whisky’s distinctive taste. And this was all accomplished with simple black and white shots, and some of the best copywriting in the game.

Whiskey brands talking about their heritage is nothing new. In fact Ogilvy asserted that it’s the only product he would try to sell with heritage. But this campaign was cleverer than that. Commuters began to look forward to the next ‘instalment’, but they may not have understood all the reasons why. Jack Daniels owned the same cross-track ‘sites’, so that the posters always appeared in the same space; like any good series, you look forward to a new episode, and you look in the same place.
It may only be a poster campaign, and I know that it’s all the rage to talk about our ‘new’ media channels. But tellingly we never refer the stuff before as ‘old’; it may not be trendy at the moment, but it’s certainly not ageing and definitely not approaching death. And thankfully Jack Daniel’s didn’t break my rule number one for underground posters – a hard call to action. Even better it didn’t ask me to text ‘808080’ as so many do, which is always challenging on the tube.
So there it is, and I wouldn’t be surprised to see them popping up again in 2012. According to CBS Outdoor, 87% of commuters in London welcome advertising on the Underground. I’d bet the other 13% haven’t seen the Jack Daniels’ campaign.

Christmas Senior Comms Exec, Nick Goff


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Doritos bring back slow dancing, just in time for the Christmas party!

Posted on December 15, 2011 by

At last, something edible behind our Christmas Advent campaign countdown! Our choice of some of the best marketing campaigns from 2011.

Doritos, being new to Argentina needed to expand awareness of their product. Deciding to focus on the youth, they extensively researched online, and came to the conclusion that the youth were missing out on togetherness. In a world where socialising is moving online, teenagers were missing out on the opportunity to approach the people they fancied and have physical contact.

To satisfy this generational desire, Doritos brought back the slow dance and by using a combination of media and online petitions they lead the cause and created a cultural movement that was quickly picked up by the consumer. Over 320 clubs around Argentina brought back the slow dance and from the blog, a dance was organised by consumers. 7,000 people slow danced under the largest disco ball in Argentina- the Planetarium and the event became the largest ever flash mob in Latin America, drawing huge attention from the media.

Because of this campaign, the youth of Argentina now associate Doritos with their dreams and desires. Doritos sales increase by 54%Doritos ranked as one of the Top 3 preferred brands by the youth.

 

submitted by: Christmas Designer, Lara Stower


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , ,

How many tweets does it take to find a Fox?

Posted on by

Continuing our countdown of the years best campaigns…

This year Brazil sponsored the biggest music festival in Sao Paulo – the Planeta Terra Festival which sold out within hours. Volkswagen saw the festival as an opportunity to promote their coolest young car, the Fox, to a youth market through a mash up of Twitter, Google maps and real world prize locations.

Volkswagen hid secret tickets across the entire city of Sao Paulo and to find them consumers had to go on a Google maps treasure hunt. The catch was that the map was zoomed all the way out and the only way to find them was to band a community together using the #foxatplanetaterra hash tag. The more tweets made, the more the map would zoom in and ultimately reveal the location of each ticket. It then became a 4 day real world foot race to find them.

In less than 2 hours the campaign hashtag was the #1 trending topic in Brazil where it stayed for the length of the campaign – I think this is a great example of an interactive yet simple approach to tap into a target audience that is usually difficult to reach.

 

Submitted by: Christmas Digital Project Manager, Hannah Miller


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , ,

Nike makes a splash with 3d water projections

Posted on December 12, 2011 by

Continuing our daily pick of some of the best marketing campaigns of the year, on day 12 the INITIALS Advent calendar takes a look across the pond…

For the past couple of years, 3d projections and lights displays have been hugely popular in the marketing world. Brands have been competing with each other globally to ensure their brand stands out from the rest. The Nike launch in New York for Jordan Melo M8 shoe stepped it up a gear and brought a whole new meaning to projection advertising.

The captivating show used water fountains as the projection medium and brought the water to life. The dramatic entrance of a helicopter dropped a diver into the water, using special effects and an 85-foot 3D projector, 2,500 spectators were treated to a encapsulating lights and water showcase over Pier 54 at Hudson River Park with a three story tall Carmelo Anthony sporting his new shoes and slam dunking on the water. For the rest of us not at the event, Nike also provided a live feed through a microsite dedicated specifically to the Melo shoe.

With more than half a dozen shoe designs already in the Jordan Melo line, the collaboration with Anthony has been an undeniable way for both to make a splash.

 

submitted by: Christmas Communications Manager, Kate Denny


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

9th Dec. A campaign that definitely deserves the rocky theme tune

Posted on December 9, 2011 by

Friday’s pick of the best marketing campaigns of the year for the INITIALS Advent calendar…Tiger Beer – Know the not known

Know the not knownWhat does beautifully intriguing art direction, genuine understanding of an urban target audience and desirable benefits get you? Obviously the ‘Know The Not Known’ campaign by Tiger Beer.

It’s essentially a call to action to get consumers to explore their communication and reward them accordingly for their curiosity.

Using a variety of hooks, this integrated campaign invites consumers to follow Tiger Beer references in the campaign media, driving them to the Facebook page and thus rewarding them with access to underground, invite only Tiger Beer events. Hosting a range of different up and coming talents from the arts, music, design and film world.

Having been in full swing since October 2010 and still going strong, this is a great example of an engaging and innovative campaign, resonating well with the target audience whilst showing longevity and integration.

Greg Farrington, Christmas Art Director


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I’m a n00b, get me out of here / Vets on a rampage

Posted on December 8, 2011 by

Continuing our daily pick of some of the best marketing campaigns of the year, on day 8 the INITIALS Advent calendar takes a look at gaming…

In a year that will see computer games outsell cinema by almost double, one of the most hotly anticipated titles was launched with all the razzamatazz of a Hollywood blockbuster. Modern Warfare 3.

Typical TV ads show-off gameplay to sell titles but not MW3, which had some big release challengers. In a nutshell, two “real life” characters were used to demonstrate in-game experience.

Creating intrigue for new players and wry smiles for people embarking on purchase, it’s a fresh, new take on gaming advertising that helped lead to 1.5m people queuing until midnight to get their first copy, 9.3m copies sold on day one, and ‘n00bs’ getting shot by vets.

 


Did you like this? Share it:

Posted in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


← Older Posts